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    Family Law: Attending Court for the first time

    6/10/16 9:32 PM

    As much as possible, we like to think that legal eagles are just normal people plus a slight addiction to coffee. However, if you are attending Court for the first time, you will probably see some of the more unusual elements of the legal profession.

    Keep reading for our top six to ensure you know exactly what to expect when entering the Courthouse.

     People bow going in and out of Court rooms. They are bowing to the coat of arms at the back of the Court room.

    1. Judges, magistrates and barristers will be wearing white wigs. It is actually an important sign of their profession.
    2. Judges, magistrates and barristers wear black robes. You might notice that the robes are slightly different depending on who is wearing them.
    3. The judge or magistrate is referred to as “Your Honour” in Court. This is a matter of respect and should be observed at all times.
    4. The Court will usually adjourn at a convenient time for both morning tea and lunch (lawyers need snacks too!).
    5. Electronic recording devices are not permitted in the Court rooms. You might notice the small libraries of notes, files and books that people bring with them into the Court room – these documents are their reference notes for hearings and the like.

     If you have a family law matter, concerns or questions about reaching a conclusion in your family law property settlement or dispute resolution in your family law issue and want to find out more please do not hesitate to contact us on 9688 6023 or email us at info@franklegal.com.au.

     Contact The Family Law Team For A  Free First Conference

     This article is provided to the reader for general information. It is not legal advice. It was written by Andrea Spencer & Emily Graham and edited by James Frank.

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    Family Law Property Settlement, Family Law Property Settlement in NSW, Court, Reaching a Conclusion, Dispute Resolution